Outlook Error “The name of the security certificate is invalid or does not match the name of the site.”

Seen in Outlook when connecting to a mailbox on an Exchange Server, its caused by using a self signed certificate OR a purchased certificate, where the internal and external names are different.


1. On the Exchange Server > Start > All Programs > Microsoft Exchange Server {version} > Exchange Management Console. Issue the following four commands;
Exchange 2010 and SBS 2011 (change the values in red)

Set-ClientAccessServer -Identity EXCHANGE-MAIL -AutodiscoverServiceInternalUri https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/autodiscover/autodiscover.xml

Set-WebServicesVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\EWS (Default Web Site)” –InternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/EWS/Exchange.asmx

Set-OABVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\OAB (Default Web Site)” -InternalURL https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/OAB

Set-ActiveSyncVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\Microsoft-Server-ActiveSync (Default Web Site)” -InternalURL https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/Microsoft-Server-Activesync

Outlook Anywhere Note

If you intend to use Outlook Anywhere, you may also want to execute the following command. Particularly if you use SBS, which has a habit of setting remote.publicdomain.com as the default outside name.

Set-WebServicesVirtualDirectory –Identity ‘EXCHANGE-MAIL\EWS (Default Web Site)’ –ExternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/ews/exchange.asmx

Exchange 2007 (change the values in red)

Set-ClientAccessServer -Identity EXCHANGE-MAIL -AutodiscoverServiceInternalUri https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/autodiscover/autodiscover.xml

Set-WebServicesVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\EWS (Default Web Site)” -InternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/ews/exchange.asmx

Set-OABVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\oab (Default Web Site)” -InternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/oab

Set-UMVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\unifiedmessaging (Default Web Site)” -InternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/unifiedmessaging/service.asmx
For Small Business Server 2008
For SBS 2008 the commands are Different! (the following commands are for Exchange 2007 on SBS 2008 ONLY;

Set-ClientAccessServer -Identity EXCHANGE-MAIL -AutodiscoverServiceInternalUri https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/autodiscover/autodiscover.xml

Set-WebServicesVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\EWS (SBS Web Applications)” -InternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/ews/exchange.asmx

Set-OABVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\oab (SBS Web Applications)” -InternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/oab

et-UMVirtualDirectory -Identity “EXCHANGE-MAIL\unifiedmessaging (SBS Web Applications)” -InternalUrl https://mail.publicdomain.co.uk/unifiedmessaging/service.asmx
Note: where EXCHANGE-MAIL is internal and mail.publicdomain.co.uk is external name

2. Then open the IIS Manager Expand Application Pools > MSExchangeAutodiscoverAppPool > Right Click > Recycle.
Note: You may have to enter the FQDN of the server rather than its Netbios name!!

Expand a Hard Disk with Ubuntu LVM

After you make the additional space available in VMWare/Xen/Hyper-V, first reboot your Ubuntu server so it can see the new free space (commenter Michal, below, points out that you can avoid this restart by asking the kernel to rescan the disk with ‘echo 1 > /sys/class/block/sda/device/rescan’). Then we’ll run the GNU partition editor to examine our disk:

root@myserver:/# parted
GNU Parted 2.2
Using /dev/sda
Welcome to GNU Parted! Type 'help' to view a list of commands.
(parted) print free
Model: VMware Virtual disk (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 42.5GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos 
Number  Start   End     Size    Type      File system  Flags
        32.3kB  32.8kB  512B              Free Space
 1      32.8kB  255MB   255MB   primary   ext2         boot
        255MB   255MB   8192B             Free Space
 2      255MB   16.1GB  15.8GB  extended
 5      255MB   16.1GB  15.8GB  logical                lvm
 3      16.1GB  21.5GB  5365MB  primary
        21.5GB  21.5GB  6856kB            Free Space 
        21.5GB  42.5GB  21.0GB            Free Space <------
You can see your free space, so let’s partition it:

Pick your free space, select New, then choose a Primary or Logical partition. For a small server, it probably doesn’t matter too much, but remember in x86 Linux that you can have a maximum of 4 primary + extended partitions per disk. Beyond that, you’ll need to begin adding logical partitions in your extended partitions.

Select the Write command to create the partition, then (if necessary) reboot your system.

When your system comes back up, check on your new partition:

fdisk-l /dev/sda
Disk /dev/sda: 42.5 GB, 21474836480 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2610 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/Osize (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x000d90ee
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1*           1          31      248832   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda231        1958    15476768    5  Extended
/dev/sda31958        2610     5239185   83  Linux
/dev/sda42610        3608    16815191   83  Linux <-----
/dev/sda531        1958    15476736   8e  Linux LVM 
So now let’s pull it into our LVM configuration. First we’ll create the physical volume:
$ pvcreate /dev/sda4
  Physical volume "/dev/sda4"successfully created
Let’s take a look at our physical volumes:
$ pvdisplay
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda5
  VG Name               ubuntu-1004
  PV Size               14.76 GiB / not usable 2.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes(but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              3778
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          3778
  PV UUID               f3tYaB-YCoK-ZeRq-LfDX-spqd-ggeV-gdsemo
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda3
  VG Name               ubuntu-1004
  PV Size               5.00 GiB / not usable 401.00 KiB
  Allocatable           yes
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              1279
  Free PE               11
  Allocated PE          1268
  PV UUID               rL0QG1-OmuS-d4qL-d9u3-K7Hk-4a1l-NP3DtQ
  "/dev/sda4"is a new physical volume of "20.00 GiB"
  --- NEW Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda4
  VG Name
  PV Size               20.00 GiB
  Allocatable           NO
  PE Size               0
  Total PE              0
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          0
  PV UUID               uaJn0v-HbRz-YKv4-Ez83-jVUo-dfyH-Ky2oHV 
Now, extend our physical volume group (ubuntu-1004) into our new physical volume (/dev/sda4):
$ vgextend ubuntu-1004 /dev/sda4
  Volume group "ubuntu-1004"successfully extended
The whole purpose of this exercise is to expand the root filesystem, so let’s find our main logical volume:
$ lvdisplay
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Name                /dev/ubuntu-1004/root
  VG Name                ubuntu-1004
  LV UUID                UJQUwV-f3rI-Tsd3-dQYO-exIk-LSpq-2qls13
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                19.39 GiB
  Current LE             1892
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently setto     256
  Block device           254:0
Now, let’s extend the logical volume to all free space available:
$ lvextend -l+100%FREE /dev/ubuntu-1004/root
Next, extend the filesystem:
$ resize2fs /dev/mapper/ubuntu--1004-root
Finally, let’s check our free space:
df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
                       39G   14G   24G  37% /   <---- 
none                  495M  176K  495M   1% /dev
none                  500M     0  500M   0% /dev/shm
none                  500M   36K  500M   1% /var/run
none                  500M     0  500M   0% /var/lock
none                  500M     0  500M   0% /lib/init/rw
/dev/sda1             228M  144M   72M  67% /boot

Exchange Powershell Commands

1. Granting User Rights for Mailbox Exports in Exchange 2010 SP1:

New-ManagementRoleAssignment -Role “Mailbox Import Export” -User Administrator


New-MailboxImportRequest -Mailbox “Administrator” -FilePath “\\Exchange\Backup_PSTs\administrator.pst”


New-MailboxExportRequest -Mailbox administrator -FilePath “\\Exchange\Backup_PSTs\administrator.pst”


foreach ($i in (Get-Mailbox)) { New-MailboxExportRequest -Mailbox $i -FilePath “\\Exchange\Backup_PSTs\$($i.Alias).pst” }


foreach ($i in (Get-Mailbox -OrganizationalUnit “domain.dk”)) { New-MailboxExportRequest -Mailbox $i -FilePath “\\Exchange\Backup_PSTs\$($i.Alias).pst” }


Get-MailboxExportRequest | Get-MailboxExportRequestStatistics

6. Full Accesss to Mailboxes

Get-Mailbox -ResultSize unlimited -Filter {(RecipientTypeDetails -eq ‘UserMailbox’) -and (Alias -ne ‘Admin’)} | Add-MailboxPermission -User Administrator@domain.dk -AccessRights fullaccess -InheritanceType all

7. Export all SMTP Adresses to .csv

get-mailbox -resultsize unlimited | select-object name, @{Name=”AccountName”; Expression={$_.SAMAccountName}}, Alias, @{Name=”Email”; Expression={$_.PrimarySMTPAddress}}, RecipientTypeDetails, Servername, @{Name=”Account Status”; Expression={$_.ExchangeUserAccountControl}} | Export-Csv -path c:\User-Details.csv -noTypeInformation

8. Export All Mailbox Sizes to .html

Get-MailboxStatistics -server “?” | Sort-Object TotalItemSize -Descending | convertto-html DisplayName,TotalItemSize, ItemCount, LastLogonTime, @{label=”TotalItemSize(MB)”;expression={$_.TotalItemSize.Value.ToMB()}} | set-content c:\mailboxsizes.html

9. List Mailboxes by mailbox databases

Get-Mailbox | Sort database, name | Format-Table name, database

10. Move all mailboxes from one database to another database

1. Launch the Exchange Management Shell > Firstly lets get the names of my Databases, then I can simply copy and paste them into the move mailbox command.


Get-Mailbox -Database “Source Database Name” ” -ResultSize Unlimited | New-MoveRequest -TargetDatabase “Target Database Name

2. The Mailbox moves should then be queued, depending on how many there are, this can take some time to complete.

3. To check on progress issue the following command;

Get-MoveRequestStatistics -MoveRequestQueue “Target Database Name

4. When complete you should remove the movement requests like so;

Get-MoveRequest | where {$_.status -eq “Completed”} | Remove-MoveRequest

5. That’s all the ‘user’ mailboxes, but your source database server may have system mailboxes in it. These will be either Arbitration mailboxes, or Archive Mailboxes (or both). I don’t have any archive mailboxes, but I do have Arbitration mailboxes. To find out for your databases, use the following commands;

Get-Mailbox -Database “Source Database Name” -Arbitration

Get-Mailbox -Database “Source Database Name” -Archive

6. To move Arbitration and Archive mailboxes, use the following commands;

Get-Mailbox -Database “Source Database Name” -Arbitration | New-MoveRequest -TargetDatabase “Target Database Name

Get-Mailbox -Database “Source Database Name” -Archive | New-MoveRequest -TargetDatabase “Target Database Name

7. You can monitor progress with the same command you used in step 3, and remove the move requests with the same command you used in step 4

Manually Set up Office 365

Outlook 2013 (PC) Manually Set up for Office 365

Follow these instructions to do so:

1. Go to Control Panel, and click Mail.
2. Click Show Profiles and then click Add.
3. Type in a friendly name for the profile, and click OK.
4. Click to select the Manual setup, and click Next.
5. Click Microsoft Exchange, and then click Next.
6. In the Server box, enter outlook.office365.com.
7. Make sure that the Use Cached Exchange Mode option is selected.
8. In the User Name box, type your name (Eg; ‘John Smith’) and then click More Settings.
9. Click the Security tab, make sure ‘Encryption’ box is unticked and choose Anonymous Authentication.
10. Click the Connection tab.
11. Make sure that the Connect to Microsoft Exchange using HTTP check box is selected, and then click Exchange Proxy Settings.
12. In the ‘Use this URL to connect to my proxy server for Exchange’ box, enter:outlook.office365.com
13. Make sure that the ‘Only connect to proxy servers that have this principal name in their certificate’ check box is selected, and enter: msstd:outlook.com
14. Click both ‘On fast networks, connect using HTTP first, then connect using TCP/IP check box, and ‘On slow networks, connect using HTTP first, then connect using TCP/IP’ check boxes.
15. Under Proxy authentication settings, click Basic Authentication.
16. Click OK twice.
17. Click Check Name. You will be prompted to login. Enter your VUW login ID followed by @staff.vuw.ac.nz (Eg; smithjo@staff.vuw.ac.nz). Tick the box for ‘Remember my credentials’ .
18. When the server name and the user name are displayed with an underline, click Next.
18. Click Finish.


Leet (or “1337“), also known as eleet or leetspeak, is an alternative alphabet for the English language that is used primarily on the Internet. It uses various combinations of ASCII characters to replace Latinate letters. For example, leet spellings of the word leet include 1337 and l33t; eleet may be spelled 31337 or 3l33t.

The term leet is derived from the word elite. The leet alphabet is a specialized form of symbolic writing. Leet may also be considered a substitution cipher, although many dialects or linguistic varieties exist in different online communities. The term leet is also used as an adjective to describe formidable prowess or accomplishment, especially in the fields of online gaming and in its original usage – computer hacking.